Liberals smacked in the face by reality

A more descriptive illustration of why socialism does not, can not and will not ever work would be hard to find:

Grant Moran, 29, also quit, saying the new pay-scale was disconcerting

“Now the people who were just clocking in and out were making the same as me,” he told the paper. “It shackles high performers to less motivated team members.”

Hmm…high performers quit working when they perceive that additional effort does not result in additional rewards. Who could have possibly predicted that?

The entire liberal mindset is predicated on the denial of basic human nature.

Just to recap how things work in the real world where most of us reside:

When actions or behaviors are rewarded, you get more of those actions or behaviors.
When actions or behaviors are punished, you get less of those actions or behaviors.

So when poor decisions, ineptitude and laziness are rewarded, guess what happens to those traits?
When good decisions, competence and hard work are punished guess what happens to those?

This isn’t rocket surgery here folks, but your basic liberal can sure find inventive ways to screw up what any average 8 year old could explain (prior to having the common sense indoctrinated out of them at government schools).

The Trump Craze

This is not a well researched or studied thesis or anything. I’m not going to do a google search and make arbitrary judgments about what I find to “verify” my theory “scientifically”…but it’s a thought I had this morning.

I have to wonder about the mania of Trump supporters who are willing to ignore all evidence that Trump is:

1. Not a conservative by any stretch of the imagination.
2. A fully grown child who throws tantrums and pouts when he doesn’t get his way.
3. A narcissist who cares only about his own well being and couldn’t give a rip about the country or its inhabitants except to the degree that caring about them advances his own interests.
4. A snake oil salesman who will say whatever he thinks you want to hear to bamboozle you into buying what he’s selling.

I could go on.

All of these things are blindingly obvious to anyone who hasn’t drunk the Trump Koolaid (heck, a couple of them he’s flat admitted to), but based on his vote totals, an astonishing number of Republicans (and democrat crossovers) have imbibed in the aforementioned cordial.

My thought was:

How much of this is due to the basic human fact that the majority of humankind is suited for and desirous of only slavery?

I know that sounds extreme, and I’m not trying to say Trump is a slaveowner…it’s metaphorical.

I could replace that with “most people are suited for and desirous of only perpetual childhood” and mean the same thing.

What I’m saying is that the majority of people want nothing more than to be cared for. They want to be protected, provided for, and dictated to by someone or something else.

They don’t want to have to make the hard decisions (or even easy decisions for that matter) or to take responsibility for their own lives and decisions.

This penchant is demonstrated by several common aspects of human nature: The weird obsession with superheros comes to mind immediately. Why are superhero movies and comics so popular? Because a large part of humankind loves the idea of having some “superhuman” being to swoop to the rescue and save them when they’re in trouble.

In the real world, the superhero is replaced by authority figures and the government. I think The Donald is playing the role of superhero at the moment. The people who’ve fully bought into his dog and pony show view him as some sort of savior and redeemer. They’ve been disappointed in the current “superhero” government so they’re grasping for another, stronger, faster, more blustery one to take its place.

I don’t know…this isn’t a fully fleshed out theory, just a thought I had this morning.

The overall theory that most people want nothing more than to be taken care of and told what to do has been in my mind for years and nothing humankind has done in my lifetime has dispelled it…I’m kind of wondering out loud if the irrational cheerleading for Trump is a manifestation of that more basic trait.

Thoughts?

A sign of the times?

Years ago, science discovered a cure for polio, antibiotics, electricity and nuclear energy. They did this through rigorous lab work, experimentation and the scientific method.

Today, “scientists” google pictures and make arbitrary decisions about what the pictures portray.

Apparently, that’s now what passes for “science”.

And the conclusion?

“It is clearly better from the dog’s point of view if you express your fondness for your pet with a pat, a kind word, and maybe a treat.”

Wow. That’s deep. It’s a good thing I had a “scientist” to tell me that or I would have never figured it out.

Obsession

What is it with the media’s obsession with the death of a minor celebrity?

Yes, I realize that the artist formerly known as The Artist Formerly Known as Prince was very good at what he did: He was a prolific song writer and very accomplished entertainer…I even enjoyed the movie he made way more than I would have expected to.

Yes, I realize that his death was somewhat premature. I’m not much younger than he was and I don’t think I’m nearly ready to go yet (unless it is in a fiery motorcycle crash, which is my ultimate goal, and therefore not untimely at all if it befalls me).

But come on…do we really have to mention his death every few minutes non-stop for days? I mean, in the grand scheme of things, how significant is his death really? It’s not like his contributions to society ended world hunger or cured cancer. He was a singer for crying out loud.

His family and friends have my heartfelt condolences and well wishes. Any death is a tragedy to those closest to them, especially an unexpected and untimely one and I am very sympathetic to their feelings.

But I didn’t know the guy. Even if I LOVED his music, I still didn’t know him personally. I feel sad for his death to the same level as I feel sad hearing about the death of anyone else I don’t know. His celebrity has no bearing on those feelings and I don’t understand why the media seems to think that it should.

Merry Buy a Gun Day!!!

It’s that time of year again: BAG day.

I actually celebrated this year for the first time in a while. Since it’s been a while, I saw no reason to limit it to one gun, I bought two.

I bought them online and talked about that in a previous post but I didn’t tell you what I got.

First, I am an NRA and 4H certified instructor and I really enjoy sharing the shooting sports with the uninitiated. I regularly teach classes, take newbies to the range, etc. The problem is that I’ve been missing something with regard to my training aids. I’ve got several flavors of semi-auto pistols to use for training, but the only working revolver I’ve got is a replica 1858 Remington cap and ball revolver. While fun to load and shoot, it isn’t really representative of modern revolver technology.

I’ve been looking for a long time for a .22lr revolver and I just couldn’t find anything that I wanted that was also in my price range. I decided that I needed to find something else. Something that fired a light enough caliber with a heavy enough frame that a newbie could handle it without too much trouble.

GP100I had a friend back in the day who had one of these and I always thought it was a great shooter, even with full house loads, so when I found a good deal on one…well…there you go:

The Ruger GP100 in .357 Magnum.

Nice heavy frame, adjustable sights, 4″ full underlug barrel, Hogue monogrips and should be very manageable for a new shooter with light .38 special loads.

And for the second gun…I’ve got a (very) old Springfield 12 gauge Pump shotgun that I bought for a song many years ago. It’s had a good run and has been a good gun for me, but it’s reaching the end of its service life. Starting to get wonky in the action…sometimes shells hang up while entering the chamber requiring one to “jiggle” the pump to get it to slide home. Also the firing pin is worn and it’s beginning to misfire by not striking the primer hard enough to ignite it.

Because it’s a not so popular brand that isn’t made any more, parts are hard to come by and resale value is low. I may try to fix her anyway just as a project, but I decided I needed something new and exciting in the shotgun arena.

I’m not a big shotgun shooter to begin with. I enjoy the occasional round of skeet and I have a thrower that I take out for some informal clay shooting sometimes, but shotgun isn’t my “thing” really…but it’s nice to have a good scatter gun when you need one. I don’t really feel the need to have a collection of shotties, so I wanted one gun that would do pretty much anything I need it to.

I thought about another pump, but I’ve not had good luck with a pump when shooting doubles in skeet. The pump is just too slow and while you’re pumping, it’s too easy to loose track of the 2nd clay. I decided I wanted a semi-auto. I wanted something long enough for shooting clays recreationally, but not so long that it would be useless for home defense or other “tactical” situation.

Other factors were that I wanted something common and popular enough that I’d be able to find accessories and parts for it and so it would carry some resale value if the need arose, but I didn’t want to break the bank on a Benelli or Baretta either.

I thought about getting a “combo” with both a 28″ and an 18″ barrel and swap out depending on what I’m doing. I was looking into the Remington 1187 but short barrels are hard to find, I’d probably have to buy a 28″ barrel and cut it down, plus the magazine capacity isn’t that great.

mossbergI started looking into Mossberg semi-autos and stumbled across this:
Mossberg 930 Jerry Miculek Pro series. Honestly, I don’t care about JM lending his name to it…in fact I usually avoid things like that to avoid the extra markup that it usually entails, but this was exactly what I was looking for.

3″ chamber, 10 round magazine (with 2 3/4″ shells), choke tubes, 24″ barrel, fiber optic front sight. Long enough barrel to effectively use it on clays, but short enough to still be useable in relatively close quarters and the best magazine capacity I’d seen on a shotgun. Perfect.

I got them both at Bud’s Gun shop in Kentucky. Their prices were right, they made the procedure easy (already had my transfer gun shop’s FFL on file) and shipping and handling was reasonably speedy. I paid using ACH so there was a delay waiting for that to clear, but you get a cash discount that way so it was worth it.

I was very satisfied with the service and my purchases. The weather here’s been crap on the weekends lately so I haven’t had the opportunity to go to the range yet, but things are looking good for this weekend. I’ll let you know how it goes.

Marry Bag Day to one and all!

Gays, Genes and circular logic

I’m no scientist, but I think I have at least a passing familiarity with how science works.

Supposedly someone discovered a “gay gene”. A gene that supposedly causes homosexual tendencies in men. Yes…yes…I know that all these “discoveries” have been debunked and there are scores of other studies that disprove the idea of a “gay gene” but bear with me.

So, to discover this “gay gene” one would assume that they used standard scientific practice. They compared the genes of gay men against the genes of straight men and found a gene that is prevalent enough in one set and not in the other to declare that this must be the “gay gene”.

With me so far?

OK…So they discover this “gay gene” be determining that gays have it and straights don’t by studying some number of gay men and straight men and controlling for other factors.

But today, in the Drudge Report (which I’m beginning to get a bit tired of. He constantly suckers me into clicking on a story only to discover that the story itself has little bearing on the sensationalist headline he gave it, but that’s beside the point) I found a link to this story:

Around half of all people, including straight men and women, could carry “gay genes”, meaning that they continue to be passed down the generations despite the tendency of homosexuals not to have children, new research suggests.

Wait…what?

So, they discover a gene that is predominantly present in gays, which causes them to declare it the “gay gene”, but then discover that it is present in about half the population regardless of their sexual orientation?

And their takeaway from this is that THIS is why the gay gene doesn’t die out through natural selection?

Grasping at straws here a bit I’d say.

How about this possibility: If you found the gene in half the population, straight included, then just perhaps your original contention that this is the “gay gene” has just been disproven by your own research.

Nah…can’t be that. We’ve got an agenda to push.

Cultural Appropriation

I have to say I’ve recently become disgusted with the blatant acts of cultural appropriation that have been reported lately.

People should be absolutely ashamed for adopting hair styles that are prevalent in another culture.

Especially when that hair style is not something that can be achieved naturally, but requires many hours of work and the use of chemicals to alter the basic consistency of the hair to achieve.

I simply cannot imagine how someone can be so callous, disrespectful and downright insulting as to appropriate another culture in such a way.

Just saying…

Celebrity photos linked from ablackcelebrity.com

What I did today

The old horn on the bike has started rusting.

I’m probably going to clean it up and keep it because it’s original equipment, but I always hated the way it sounds. It’s like a high pitched buzzer rather than a horn…sounds wimpy.

I wanted to try something that would sound more like a car horn. Harbor freight had one for $10. Yes, I know I can get better ones, but I was a little leery about how it would look and sound so I didn’t want to invest a bunch of money and then hate it.

2016-04-02 16.55.14So I went with the cheapos (yes, some assembly still required).

Admittedly, they look a little cheesy, but not as bad as I’d thought they might. They fit fine and I really like the sound a LOT more than the stock horn.

Here’s a little video, first the old horn (I did this on my work bench with my battery charger, so it’s a little shaky when I connect the power), then the new one.

Dueling stories on Drudge today

Story 1: One in five adults may be obese by 2025: survey warns

The ratio of obese adults has more than doubled in the 40 years since 1975, and will climb further in the coming nine, the research showed.

Story 2: Marion County mother charged with neglect for making children walk to school

A 32-year-old Marion County, Tenn., mother faces an April court date on child neglect charges after deputies found her driving ahead of her young daughters as she made them walk miles to school on Valley View Highway.

Ladd estimated the girls already had walked about a mile and a half and still had about two more miles to go.

We have hysterical clinicians warning us of an obesity epidemic on the one hand, and on the other hand, we have hysterical cops charging parents with neglect for making their kids walk three and a half miles.

Related issues, or just ironic?

I just purchased two guns online

I ordered my *BAG day guns already (two because I don’t buy one every year so I had some to make up for), but I haven’t received them yet.

I ordered them from a retailer online so I avoided all those inconveniences like background checks and had them delivered right to my house right?

Um…no.

That is a myth perpetuated by people who would prefer that criminals have a safe and healthful work environment by disarming all their potential victims.

Here’s the process in 12 easy steps:

1. Find the gun you want to buy (the easy part).
2. Find a Federally Licensed Firearms retailer (FFL) in your local area that will do the transfer.
3. Have the local FFL fax a copy of their Federal Firearms License to the online seller (the seller needs this to legally transfer the gun to the FFL).
4. Order the gun, using the address of your local FFL as the delivery address.
5. Wait up to 10 business days for the delivery
6. When your local FFL informs you that your gun has been delivered, go there.
7. Fill out the form 4473 (don’t abbreviate anything, including using the 2 letter designation for your state of residence or “St.” for “Street”. Apparently, to the ATF, abbreviations are a dangerous and possibly violent crime, if your FFL allows this to occur, they may lose their license and/or be fined and/or be prosecuted and the ATF will accuse them of being horrible human beings who ignore the law and transfer firearms illegally to dangerous criminals like me).
8. Wait for the FFL to run the background check (anywhere from 30 minutes to 3 days).
9. Wait for the FFL to enter the gun into their “bound book” (the same caveats about abbreviations apply here).
10. Wait for the FFL to officially transfer the gun to you by logging the transfer in their “bound book” (again with the abbreviation thing).
11. Pay the FFL their fee for running the background check and performing the transfer.
12. Take your gun home.

Simple right? Isn’t it a travesty that the online sales loophole makes it so easy to avoid those messy things like background checks and waiting periods and records of the transaction?

Or not.

By the way, I’ll tell you what I got when I actually have them in hand…I’m still waiting for my FFL to receive them.

*National Buy A Gun Day…April 15…Tax day.