By Request

A reader asked me to demonstrate disassembly of the M1 Carbine Magazine.

I always aim to please, so…

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First Video with the new computer

I finally got the video that I’ve been fighting with for ages done. It was by request for a Youtube buddy and it gave me fits trying to do it with the old computer.

Without further ado, I present M1 Carbine Disassembly:

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On an unrelated note, my wife’s surgery is Friday. Thanks to all of you who’ve wished her well and offered prayers. They are greatly appreciated.

She is very anxious about it and needs all the help she can get so further prayers wouldn’t hurt.

Needless to say, blogging is going to continue to be light at least through the middle of next week. I’m going to be waiting on her hand and foot for a while.

M1 Carbine/SKS Range Report

I finally had an opportunity to get to the indoor range and test out the M1 Carbine and SKS since my last escapades with them. The M1, I hadn’t really done anything to, but I had only fired 20 rounds through it so I wanted to shoot some more as well as zero it at 25 yards.

The SKS, I wanted to check operation with the bipod, forward grip and light installed. I wasn’t sure if the bipod or light, being newly attached to the tri-rail barrel mount, would cause any harmonics or other unusualness that might affect aim point or accuracy. I wanted to see what I could do off-hand with the vertical foregrip installed, and I wanted to make sure the light wasn’t going to crap out after the first shot.

First, the M1. I had only fired one box of ammo through it and had had three failures to fire in that 20 rounds. Not a good ratio. I cleaned the bolt again before this range trip and I brought more and different ammo this time.

I started out with the sight centered in windage and on the lowest setting on the elevation ramp. She was shooting about 2 inches high and three inches right.

After dialing in the left windage and playing around for awhile, I shot this 5 shot group at the center diamond.

For reference, the squares are one inch.

Ignore the holes on the lower left, they were left overs from zeroing and playing around. From the prone position, with no rest, military iron sights, at 25 yards, four of the 5 holes are touching. The hole high and right was shot number 3 and a called flyer. I’d say she shoots purdy good for an old girl.

This is off-hand, standing. I held two inches under the center of the diamond and put 5 right on the money. That little rifle is easy to shoot. Once I get the FTF issues ironed out, I’m thinking this is going to become my primary home defense firearm. It is light, well balanced, handles very well and puts the holes right where I’m pointing it.

I’m not sure I can express this in words, but upon taking her out of the box after the visit from the BBTOJ and lifting her to my shoulder for the first time, my immediate thought was “man, this thing just feels good to point.” It just felt so natural going up to my shoulder. I knew that if she shot worth a darn, we were going to become very close friends.

She does.

We are already.

I’ve just got to figure out why she gets stubborn sometimes.

I finished off the four mags I had loaded for a total of 60 rounds. I “only” had one failure to fire while on the last mag. I thought about shooting some more and seeing if the FTFs continued, but it was getting towards closing time and I still had more shooting to do. From looking at the primers, (successfully fired on the left, FTF on the right) it looks like the FTF was caused by a light strike. The primer is barely dimpled. The trigger felt normal and I heard the hammer fall so I don’t think the problem is in the trigger group. The fact that I went from 3 FTFs out of 20 to 1 out of 60 is a vast improvement…maybe I still didn’t get the bolt clean or perhaps there is a burr or flaw on the firing pin or bolt that I didn’t notice. I’ll check the bolt again and see what I can see. I REALLY like this rifle and I REALLY hope I can get it ironed out.

Anyway, on to the SKS. First I wanted to check out the zeros. The tech sight seemed just fine. Right on the money at 25 yards.

The scope had drifted a little bit but I got it dialed right in. I will say that I’m not terribly satisfied with the scope. I’m not actually surprised about that considering the price I paid for it…and some of it may be because I still don’t have a cheek pad and I just don’t get a good cheek weld when using it. Something that just needs more work.

Anyway, the bipod worked extremely well. Very stable, no problems with accuracy (at least any more than usual), did what it was supposed to do. I can’t complain a bit. We’ll have to see how it holds up long term, but at this point I’d say well worth the $30 investment.

The light also came through with flying colors. I tried it turned on and off and had no problems. Granted, I only went through about 70 rounds so only time will tell how well it will hold up over sustained use, but at least it didn’t crap out after the first couple of shots. Also well worth the investment…all $8.00 of it.

Finally, the vertical foregrip. The only issue I had with it was that, with the grip extended, it was just barely in the way and made it a little more difficult than usual to insert the 30 round mag. The shorter 20 round mags (which are my preferred mags anyway) were no problem. As far as stability…well, this target was shot standing, off hand using the foregrip and the Tech-sight/Williams Firesight iron sights. This was a full 30 round mag fired as fast as I could get away with (the range doesn’t allow “rapid fire” for more than a double tap…but you can still get away with firing pretty quickly as long as you don’t go crazy with it).

I was very happy with the improvement in handling. I can definitely keep it within minute-of-badguy even shooting quickly.

In a nutshell, I’m pleased with all of my additions and not in the least disappointed with any of them at this point. The only thing that really NEEDs improvement is to add a cheekpad and, if that doesn’t result in improvement, possibly a better scope.

Hopefully I’ll find the time to get out to the rifle range sometime before spring. I’m pretty eager to see what I can do with the carbine at 100 and 200 yards. I’ll keep you posted.

M1 Carbine Sling Revisited

I was surfing some of the search results from hits in my log and stumbled across more information on the sling and oiler for the M1 Carbine. Although the mechanics of installation are pretty much the same, it seems I’ve been installing my sling backwards. The buckle end is supposed to go through the oiler and the snap end is supposed to attach to the front mount point.

I honestly don’t remember why I started doing it the other way. I may have found a picture or reference that described putting it on the way I did, or it may simply have been an assumption.

Functionally, I don’t think it makes a bit of difference. The sling worked fine the way I was installing it.

There are two advantages to doing it the right way though: First, that explains why I had to smash the button tab on the end to get it to fit…it wasn’t supposed to fit. Why I didn’t think of that at the time is a bit beyond me. I guess I just got fixated on installing it the way I THOUGHT it was supposed to go and didn’t even try it the other way. I’ve been called a lot of things in my life, but “genius” has never been one of them.

Second, this way is the way it is “supposed” to be installed so there is less chance that you’ll run across someone at the range who knows better and ridicules you for having it backward…or, worse yet, just thinks “what an idiot” and doesn’t bother to tell you.

Anyway, I stand corrected. The installation/removal procedures remain the same as previously described, just reverse the ends.

New and improved

I followed the advice of commenter and my best friend from WAAAAAY back, CB.

I recorded a voiceover for the M1 Carbine Assembly video that I did before.

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He’s also recommended a couple of things for me to collect some spare change toward replacing my recently deceased computer and coming into the Maclight.

Here’s what I’m a gonna do. I’m going to put my gunsmithing series posts on CD. I’m going to put up a payment link (I’m trying to use gearpay but they haven’t perfected their vendor functions yet…if they don’t get it ready by the time I’m finished converting all these posts, I’ll hold my nose and use Paypal) and sell copies of the M1 Carbine series posts and the “Evolution of a homeland defense rifle” posts for a nominal sum.

Depending upon the reception that this video receives, I’m planning on doing some more, better quality videos based on field stripping, cleaning and reassembly of all of my firearms. I’ll post them as I finish them (at reduced, for the web, resolution) but I’ll also make them available (at full quality resolution) for purchase as well.

He gave me a couple other ideas that I’m kicking around as well.

If anyone has any thoughts or suggestions, ideas for more videos or posts, anything that might help me raise enough money to buy a replacement computer so I can get off this dog slow dinosaur that I’m currently cursed with…please leave a comment.

Clarification

In comments to my last post, KurtP asked:

But looking at the pics and your step-by-step, I’m wondering something.
It looks like the back (stock) strap is held in by the oiler.

I’m sure that being a sailor, you’re a believer in the KISS principle (like me), so just curious why not just double-up the sling and put the loop through the stock?

That’s what it seems like you’re doing, but with lots of extra steps.

Or am I missing something not obvious?

I doubt that you are missing anything obvious. I’m guessing that my description simply was inadequate. Let me try to explain it a little better.

The oiler basically is the rear sling mount. The sling wraps around the oiler when installed. This serves a dual purpose, it provides a solid mounting point for the sling as well as retains the oiler to prevent its loss.

In keeping with my experience as a Navy Master Training Specialist, I find it impossible to clearly explain without illustrations so please refer to figure 1 (Click to make bigger).

This is a top down cutaway view of the stock, oiler and sling.

The oiler slot is cut into the stock with a slight bevel. This allows the oiler to fit past the opening into the slot. However, if the sling is wrapped around the oiler, it will not fit through the cut. Therefore, it is impossible to simply make a loop in the sling, push it through the cut, insert the oiler and then pull the whole thing into the stock cut. It simply won’t fit. If it would slip in that way, it would be able to slip out that way and the oiler would be lost.

It is possible to insert the oiler into the cut, then thread the sling through on one side, wrap it around the oiler and thread it through the other side. The method that I described…sliding the sling through the cut, inserting the oiler, and then threading the sling around the oiler and back through the cut…is the easiest method of installing the sling and oiler.

After the sling is installed in this way, the sling and oiler combination are too wide to fit back through the cut in the stock, they cannot slip out and, so, there is no way to lose the oiler and the sling is securely attached.

I hope that explained it a bit better, if not, let me know and I’ll try again.

M1 Carbine Part 12: The infamous sling and sling oiler

In M1 Carbine Part 1, we took a look at the external condition of the new old CMP M1 Carbine.

In M1 Carbine Part 2, we disassembled the M1 Carbine into its major groups.

In M1 Carbine Part 3, we disassembled the Trigger Housing Assembly into its individual components.

In M1 Carbine Part 4, we disassembled the bolt without using the M1 Carbine Bolt Tool (don’t try this at home kiddies).

In M1 Carbine Part 5, we removed the components from the stock and receiver that were necessary to remove for inspection and discussed those items not removed.

In M1 Carbine Part 6, we examined the component markings and determined whether the parts are correct for the period and manufacturer.

In M1 Carbine Part 7, we reassembled the trigger housing group.

In M1 Carbine Part 8, we reassembled the bolt without the benefit of an M1 Carbine bolt tool.

In M1 Carbine Part 9, we reassembled the components removed from the stock and receiver.

In M1 Carbine Part 10, we disassembled the bolt using the M1 Carbine Bolt tool.

In M1 Carbine Part 11, we assembled the bolt using the M1 Carbine Bolt tool.

Update: I was installing the sling backward. The installation procedure remains the same; however, reverse the ends. The buckle end goes through the oiler and the button snap end attaches to the front mount. This prevents you from having to use the blunt object method of flattening the button snap tab to get it to fit through the oiler slot. I plead ignorance and lack of intelligence. Sorry for the confusion.


This is the final installment of this series on the new old M1 Carbine. In this edition, we’re going to install and remove the standard GI web sling and sling oiler.

The sling I purchased for my M1 Carbine is new production, not an original WWII GI piece. For that reason, I was not shy about “making it work”. I don’t know how my new production sling stacks up as far as size and shape of the tabs and clips etc. It was a very tight fit and so I did have to “modify” it to make it fit slightly better.

My stock is an “oval cut” versus “I cut”. I don’t believe that the sling and oiler installation would be any different, but I don’t know that for a a fact.

One side of the stock is cut with a slot for the oiler to fit into.

The other side has a “ramp” sling well cut into it.

The front sling mount is a standard rectangular ring attached to the barrel band.

An integral part of the sling mount is a dual purpose item called the “oiler”.

I purchased an original WWII era GI oiler to go with my rifle. This is simply a tube for gun oil to be carried in with a metal needle dripper attached to the cap.

When the cap is installed, it forms a simple metal cylinder.

To attach the rear of the sling, the first step is to insert the sling end through the slot in the stock.

To ensure you put it through the right way, hold the sling flat against the “ramp” cut in the stock with the end toward the butt. The locking pin that protrudes from the sling mounting tab should be pointing out away from the stock.

After the sling end has been passed through the slot in the stock, insert the oiler into the cut on side of the stock opposite the sling “ramp” cut. It may be a little tight but it will fit.

The wrap the sling end around the oiler and push the end back through the slot on the other….uh oh.

This is where I had issues. The mounting tab with the hole was too thick to pass through the slot in the stock after the oiler was installed. I tried some other methods of installation but no joy.

I ended up having to perform a highly technical and complicated “tab flattening” procedure.

I don’t know that I would have been so quick to pull out the old blunt instrument had this been a 60 year old WWII vintage sling, but with a cheap reproduction, I wasn’t overly concerned. After flattening the tab somewhat, I had to use a drill bit to ream the hole back out so that the locking pin would fit through it, but since then I have had no further problems with installing the sling.

Picking up where I left off before the emergency surgery break…wrap the sling end around the oiler and stuff the tab end back through the slot in the stock.

At that point, the oiler side should look something like this.

Back on the other side, push the locking pin through the hole in the locking tabs.

.

The front is a pretty self-explanatory. Make sure you insert the front end of the sling through the front sling ring so that the sling isn’t twisted.

Basically stick it through and thread it through the buckle. Nothing to it.

And there you have it.

Use the buckle on the front end of the sling to adjust the length.

Removal is basically the opposite of installation. The only thing of note is when removing the rear of the sling from the oiler.

You may have to hold the oiler in place while pushing the loose end through the slot.

The slot is cut at a slight angle. If the oiler tries to push out of the slot while the sling is being pushed out, it will pinch and bind the whole thing up. Holding the oiler in place while the end of the sling is being pushed out will make it a much smoother operation.

After pulling the end through the cut, remove the oiler, then pull the sling free of the stock.

That’s it. I hope you’ve gotten some useful information out of this series. If you have any questions, suggestions for topics that I may have missed or further information, feel free to comment or e-mail me using the contact me link in the sidebar.

M1 Carbine Part 11: Using the M1 Carbine bolt tool (assembly)

In M1 Carbine Part 1, we took a look at the external condition of the new old CMP M1 Carbine.

In M1 Carbine Part 2, we disassembled the M1 Carbine into its major groups.

In M1 Carbine Part 3, we disassembled the Trigger Housing Assembly into its individual components.

In M1 Carbine Part 4, we disassembled the bolt without using the M1 Carbine Bolt Tool (don’t try this at home kiddies).

In M1 Carbine Part 5, we removed the components from the stock and receiver that were necessary to remove for inspection and discussed those items not removed.

In M1 Carbine Part 6, we examined the component markings and determined whether the parts are correct for the period and manufacturer.

In M1 Carbine Part 7, we reassembled the trigger housing group.

In M1 Carbine Part 8, we reassembled the bolt without the benefit of an M1 Carbine bolt tool.

In M1 Carbine Part 9, we reassembled the components removed from the stock and receiver.

In M1 Carbine Part 10, we disassembled the bolt using the M1 Carbine Bolt tool.

This time we are going to reassemble the bolt using the bolt tool.

In Part 10, we already went over the construction and functions of the bolt tool so if something about the specific use of the bolt tool doesn’t make sense to you, click the above link to Part 10 for a better description of the tool itself.

To begin assembling the bolt, the first step is to prepare the tool:

Back the threaded screw out so that it is out of the way when placing the bolt body into the tool. Also, rotate the extractor plunger compressor so that the forked flange is pointed toward the body of the tool.

Next, insert the ejector spring and ejector into the hole at the edge of the bolt face.

The ejector must be oriented so that the notch is aligned with the extractor pin hole in the bolt body.

The following pictures depict the bolt outside of the tool because I couldn’t get clear pictures with the bolt in the tool, but at this point the bolt body should be placed into the tool just as it was during disassembly. The ejector should be positioned so that it is aligned with the pin in the closed end of the tool, the larger lug on the bolt body should be above the threaded screw.

After the bolt body is in place in the tool, drop the extractor spring into the angled hole in the large lug on the bolt.

The extractor spring plunger has a flat side that locks the extractor in place once installed.

With the bolt inserted into the tool, the plunger should be placed on the ejector spring so that the flat portion is toward the tool.

If that is unclear: hold the bolt in front of your body with the bolt face up and with the larger lug to your right and the smaller lug to your left. The “front” of the bolt would be the part facing your body, the “back” would be facing away from your body. The flat part of the plunger should be toward the “back” of the bolt, or facing away from you, when installed.

While holding the assembly (remember that the bolt should be inserted into the tool already at this point) so that the plunger stays as close to vertical as possible to prevent it from falling, rotate the extractor plunger compressor down until it is positioned over the plunger.

Then, while keeping the ejector lined up with the pin in the closed end of the bolt tool, slowly turn the threaded screw to lock the bolt into the tool and compress the ejector and extractor plunger into position. The plunger should compress almost completely into the extractor spring well.

At this point, the assembly should be pretty solid and stable with both springs compressed.

Insert the firing pin into the bottom of the bolt.

Line the firing pin alignment tab up with the slot in the bolt and insert the firing pin as far as it will go.

Insert the extractor pin into the extractor pin hole in the bolt.

Press the extractor into place.

When the extractor is properly seated, its top surface should be flush with the bolt body. You may have to jiggle the extractor a little while pressing in to get it to pop past the extractor plunger and lock into place.

All that is left is to back out the threaded screw to release the bolt and remove it from the tool.

I cannot possibly express how much easier it is to work with the M1 Carbine bolt using this tool rather than without it. It is well worth the investment.

To round it out at an even dozen, my final post in this series will be installing and removing the sling and sling oiler so be looking for that one shortly.

M1 Carbine Part 10: Using the M1 Carbine bolt tool (disassembly)

In M1 Carbine Part 1, we took a look at the external condition of the new old CMP M1 Carbine.

In M1 Carbine Part 2, we disassembled the M1 Carbine into its major groups.

In M1 Carbine Part 3, we disassembled the Trigger Housing Assembly into its individual components.

In M1 Carbine Part 4, we disassembled the bolt without using the M1 Carbine Bolt Tool (don’t try this at home kiddies).

In M1 Carbine Part 5, we removed the components from the stock and receiver that were necessary to remove for inspection and discussed those items not removed.

In M1 Carbine Part 6, we examined the component markings and determined whether the parts are correct for the period and manufacturer.

In M1 Carbine Part 7, we reassembled the trigger housing group.

In M1 Carbine Part 8, we reassembled the bolt without the benefit of an M1 Carbine bolt tool.

In M1 Carbine Part 9, we reassembled the components removed from the stock and receiver and debuted my major groups reassembly video.

In this edition of the series, we are going to explore using the M1 Carbine bolt tool to disassemble the bolt.

In part 4 we discovered that disassembly of the bolt without the bolt tool is not advisable. There are just some things that you need the right tools to do properly. Considering that the tool is available for about $25 it just makes sense to invest in one.

I actually ordered mine from the Civilian Marksmanship Program’s E-store but they don’t seem to carry them any more.

At first the tool looks a little daunting, but it’s really pretty straightforward. The only thing that took some “figuring out” was the two ended chicken head looking deally-bob at the top.

Based upon my experience in disassembling/assembling the bolt without the tool, it is apparent that the flanges are designed to compress the extractor spring plunger…therefore, this component will be referred to as the extractor plunger compressor…but why are there two flanges on a rotating base? Ahhh! they’re different.

The solid flange is designed to be used during disassembly.

The forked flange is for assembly.

With that mystery solved, let’s begin.

First, loosen the threaded “screw” on the side of the tool to retract it out of the way (I put “screw” in quotes because I would normally call such a piece of hardware a “bolt”; however, considering the nature of what we are doing, I think calling it a “bolt” would be confusing so I’m going to call it a screw).

Rotate the extractor plunger compressor so that the solid flange is pointing toward the body of the tool.

The bolt is placed into the tool with the bolt face toward the closed end of the tool. The tab on the firing pin that protrudes from the side of the bolt should be toward the tool when putting them together.

The bolt lugs should sit flat against the sides of the tool with the large lug above the threaded screw.

Next, press the extractor plunger compressor so that the flange is forced in between the plunger and the extractor.

The closed end of the tool also has a pin that will compress the ejector while removing the extractor. That pin is adjustable but I did not have to adjust it on my tool, it worked perfectly “out of the box” (it came in a bag but you know what I mean).

Hold the bolt into the tool to keep the ejector compressor pin aligned with the ejector, at the same time maintain a slight pressure on the extractor plunger compressor so that it doesn’t slip off the plunger. Turn the threaded screw so that it presses against the large lug.

Continue tightening the screw until the extractor plunger is completely compressed into the well in the bolt lug.

At this point, the extractor should be loose in the bolt. If it isn’t, you may need to jiggle it, the extractor plunger compressor, or the bolt. If all else fails, turn the assembly over. There is a hole in the bottom of the tool for the express purpose of using a punch to drive the extractor out of the bolt. I have yet to have to use it. Once the extractor plunger is completely compressed into its well, the extractor just falls out of the bolt.

After the extractor has been removed, the firing pin will slide out the rear of the bolt.

Then, release the bolt from the tool by backing out the threaded screw. Be careful, with the tool installed, both the extractor plunger spring and the ejector spring are compressed. If you pop the tool off the bolt without completely removing the pressure, one or both of these springs could fire small but important parts across your working area.

Also, the extractor plunger is TINY. If you drop it, you may be in for quite an adventure trying to find it. It is ferrous so you can use a magnetic pickup tool to help you track it down, but better to be careful and not lose it in the first place if you ask me.

One completely disassembled M1 Carbine bolt.

I was originally going to do disassembly and assembly as one post but blogger seems to be on the fritz and I can’t upload any more pictures at the moment.

I’ll go ahead and post this one and then do assembly as another post after I can get the pix uploaded. It may be later on today or possibly tomorrow. It all depends upon when I can get blogger to cooperate again.

M1 Carbine Part 9: Major group reassembly

In M1 Carbine Part 1, we took a look at the external condition of the new old CMP M1 Carbine.

In M1 Carbine Part 2, we disassembled the M1 Carbine into its major groups.

In M1 Carbine Part 3, we disassembled the Trigger Housing Assembly into its individual components.

In M1 Carbine Part 4, we disassembled the bolt without using the M1 Carbine Bolt Tool (don’t try this at home kiddies).

In M1 Carbine Part 5, we removed the components from the stock and receiver that were necessary to remove for inspection and discussed those items not removed.

In M1 Carbine Part 6, we examined the component markings and determined whether the parts are correct for the period and manufacturer.

In M1 Carbine Part 7, we reassembled the trigger housing group.

In M1 Carbine Part 8, we reassembled the bolt without the benefit of an M1 Carbine bolt tool.

This time, we’re going to reassemble the few components that we removed from the stock and receiver, then the debut of my new video “Reassembly of M1 Carbine Major Groups.”

The only things we removed from the Receiver itself were the gas piston and gas piston nut.

I removed them using nothing more than a punch and hammer and a pair of pliers. By the time I got to the point of reassembling them, I had received my handy-dandy Piston Nut Wrench from the CMP E-store. They don’t seem to carry them any more but they can still be had at Numrich Gun Parts.

Reinstalling them is simple. The piston goes into the well flange first.

Then get the nut started. It has standard, right hand threads.

Then use the wrench to snug it down.

When clean, properly installed and correctly operating, the piston should slide in and out of its own weight when the receiver/barrel is tipped back and forth.

The only things removed from the stock were the butt plate and the recoil plate and screw.

The buttplate is pretty self-explanatory…pop it on and install the screw.

The recoil plate isn’t much more complicated.

There is a lip on the recoil plate that holds it into position. The recoil plate is lowered into the receiver well in the stock…

…and then slid to the rear into position. This engages the lip on the recoil plate into the stock wood.

Then it’s just a matter of installing the screw.

That’s it. As was mentioned during disassembly, there are other components on the stock/receiver that can be removed, but not easily and removal should only be performed for repair/replacement of those items. They didn’t need to be removed for inspection and, so, they weren’t.

Finally. The moment we’ve all been waiting for. We disassembled the carbine into its major groups, disassembled, cleaned and inspected the components in those major groups and then reassembled the major group components.

Now to reassemble the major groups into a working rifle. I’m proud to present Lone Sailor Productions first video feature: M1 Carbine assembly:

[Update] The original video’s audio was very low and hard to hear. I updated the video with a voiceover of the audio descriptions. The below video was changed to the new version. [/Update]

Drum roll please…

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