I don’t understand.

I’ve been meaning to post this for the past couple of days but I just haven’t had time.

Here’s my quandary. This happened on Monday, but it’s noticeable any day with similar weather conditions:

It was a nice, cool but clear morning; on the way to work, I saw probably 20 motorcycles on the road…other than me, of course.

On the way home, I saw one. Two counting me.

What was the difference? On the way home it was raining. Not too badly, but it had been raining pretty hard off and on all afternoon.

Here’s my question: How did all those people who rode motorcycles to work in the morning, get back home in the evening? Do they leave their bikes at work and have someone else take them home? Call their wives/husbands to come pick them up? Take the bus? Drive their bikes home at the first sign of weather and get their cars?

I just don’t understand it. I realize that most motorcycle riders (especially these days) are not really “bikers”. They’re hobbyists or fair weather riders; but I don’t get how they work that out when the weather is only fair for half the day.

One other thing I’ve noticed lately. A LOT more riders wearing full ballistic gear, even on cruisers or tourers, commuting to and from work. It seems that gas prices have enticed quite a few newbies to take up motorcycles for their commute.

A distinctive feature of these newer riders is that they rarely wave at other riders. For them, it seems it’s a practical thing…the bike is just another vehicle that gets good gas mileage…and as a result they don’t consider themselves among the brotherhood of bikers.

And, I would imagine, those are the very people who only ride one way when the weather goes pear shaped…but I still don’t understand the logistics of that particular trait.

Oh well…no skin off my butt. It was just something that is distinctly obvious under circumstances like Monday’s and got me wondering. Pretty soon, as with every year, I’ll be one of the very few bikes on the road for several months anyway.

By the way…the other biker I saw on my way home from work on Monday? He waved.

4 thoughts on “I don’t understand.

  1. I think that many people do call someone to get them or ride with a co-worker when the weather ‘turns bad’. I’m not a rider but I’ve seen it here in Texas.

    The part about not waving; I think that is related to the lack of experience in the community. I see it in the gunnie world also; the people who have been in it a while don’t hesitate to talk to, let others try their firearms etc. Newer shooters seem unsure of the protocol so they don’t want to offend anyone — and then seem stand offish.

  2. Wasn’t it like five days ago you almost got killed by someone on your bike? That’s one of the reasons I don’t wave. I don’t care how nice the weather is or how deserted the road. There is no way of knowing when someone texting in their SUV will fly out in front of me. I am not taking my hands off the bars for anyone. That said, I do nod to people who show me respect on the road, bikers or not.

    @Bob: I must admit, I am one of those people new to the “gunnie world”, kinda. I don’t mind chatting people up, ever. I’ve met some great guys and gals at our local gun shows and on the range. I don’t ever let people outside of my bloodline touch my guns though.

  3. I see your point Joe. I wasn’t necessarily railing on newer riders for not waving. I was just making the observation.

    I don’t wave every time. If I’m changing lanes, too near other traffic, or otherwise occupied with my primary responsibility at the time (driving the darn vehicle), I don’t worry about looking for other bikes or waving at them. And a good number of the ones who don’t wave back were probably just paying attention to something more important to them at that time and would have waved had they not been otherwise occupied.

    But with that said, when no otherwise engaged in the task of driving, I personally don’t think waving at fellow riders is any more dangerous than scanning the mirrors for traffic or using hand-signals to back up the blinkers, but that’s just me. To each his own.

    I guess the main thrust of my observation was how many new riders there are around. That’s not a bad thing. The more of us there are, the more aware the cage drivers will become that we’re out there.

    As far as the guy who tried to kill me the other day…that was 100 percent intentional and waving or not waving had no bearing on it whatsoever. I can assure you, while I was engaged in trying not to get killed by him, I wasn’t paying attention to any other bikes around or worrying about waving.

    But, as I said, you make a good point. The primary consideration when behind the wheel/handlebars, is ALWAYS operating the vehicle safely and properly. With that I agree 100 percent.

  4. “As far as the guy who tried to kill me the other day…that was 100 percent intentional and waving or not waving had no bearing on it whatsoever. I can assure you, while I was engaged in trying not to get killed by him, I wasn’t paying attention to any other bikes around or worrying about waving.”

    Yeah, I caught that in the article, and there sure are a lot of homicidal maniacs out there. A lot of them are just oblivious to the world around them, but some like the guy you had the misfortune of coming in contact with, are malicious and reckless.

    Tons of respect for you man, and I hope you never have one of those days, or drivers, again.

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