One thing I’ve been remiss in posting about

Are some of my newest acquisitions. I’ve commented on a couple of blogs about them, but I’ve never hit the subjects here very hard. In my last CZ-82 gunsmithing post, I mentioned that I bought two more. I won’t post pictures of them because…well, when you’ve seen one stock CZ-82, you’ve seen them all. I do plan to refinish them both though so you’ll get a look at them when I start that process.

I also bought two, sequentially serialized stripped AR lowers. I’ve already built one of them up and I’ve got a post percolating on that build that should be up in a day or so.

Why two CZ-82’s and two AR’s you ask? Well…I have two kids you see, and someday…

Actually, my son already has dibs on my M1 Garand when I die, so I guess his sister’s going to get the Carbine. The rest I haven’t figured out yet. Don’t worry, I’ll work it out somehow.

Anyway, the point of this post: I’ve been wanting a 1911 or a long time. One of the issues that I”ve had with my combination of carry guns is that they operate differently. The Ruger does not have a manual safety. It has a decocker and is intended to be carried in condition two.

The CZ-82 has a thumb safety and I typically carry it in condition one.

The problem is that, under stress (like with someone shooting at me) I fear that I’d lose conscious track of which one I’m carrying and either forget to disengage the safety on the CZ, or get hung up trying to disengage the nonexistent safety on the Ruger.

What I’ve wanted for a long time to alleviate that problem is a 1911 with an ambidextrous safety. The problem is that I’ve never thought I could afford one reliable enough to be a carry gun.

I was wrong.

I started hearing very good things about Rock Island Armory’s entry into the 1911 field and the prices on them are downright tasty. I ended up selecting the “tactical” model which has the lowered ejection port, extended beavertail and skeletonized hammer, along with a few other nice to have bennies…including the main ingredient for me…ambidextrous safety.

I tried not to have too high expectations because at $425, it just seemed “too good to be true” to expect it to be a reliable shooter right out of the box, but I must admit that I was pleasantly surprised.

The fit and finish were much better than I expected. I have to admit that the Parkerizing isn’t proving to be as durable as I’d like…I’ve already got some holster wear after a couple of months…but functionally, I couldn’t be happier.

I did disassemble, clean and lube it after getting it home, but I did nothing else to improve reliability. The first time I took it to the range, it ate 100 rounds of my preferred carry ammo, 165 grain speer gold dot JHP (that I get from Georgia Arms for a very reasonable price), without a hiccup.

The follower on the factory 8 round magazine that came with it seemed a little cheesy to me when I first saw it, but it has fed reliably in the few months that I’ve had it. I’ve since bought 4 more Chip McCormick 8 round magazines and all of them have functioned perfectly.

I’ve now fired several hundred rounds of the above mentioned Gold Dot, 230 gr Federal Hydro-shok JHP, and 230 gr Winchester White Box FMJ with nary a problem. Not a single failure so far.

Color me a satisfied RIA customer. The only two things that could REALLY use improvement: The smooth walnut grips, combined with a smooth frontstrap just didn’t give me a good enough grip. I could especially see this causing a problem with hands that are slick for whatever reason. Also, the sights are not adjustable and have no dots. They’re taller and easier to use than stock military sights…but only slightly so. Fortunately, RIA uses a Novak cut so it shouldn’t be too difficult to find replacement three dot adjustable sights when I can afford it.

The grips, I’ve already taken care of at least for the time being. At the last gun show (astute viewers of my SKS trigger job video may have noticed the SGK stamp on the back of one of my hands…I had been to the gun show earlier in the day before filming that) I picked up a cheap $11 set of rubber grips attached with a rubber, textured front strap cover.

I don’t have a picture of the pistol wearing her new shoes at the moment, but I’ll put one up when I get a chance. The grips weren’t cut for the ambi safety so I had to slightly modify them, but I bought them for function, not for form. For that purpose, I am extremely happy. They fit very tightly…I had to put the gun in my padded vise in order to get a good enough grip to stretch them across and attach the other side…but that was a plus. That made for a very secure fit. For $11 I think it was a very good investment, at least until I can afford something better.

So now I have two carry guns with very similar control systems. Both have ambidextrous safeties in approximately the same place and that operate in the same manner (down to fire, up for safe). That vastly simplifies my training and alleviates my concerns about “grace under fire” so to speak.

I’m hoping to get my AR-15 build post up in the next few days.

CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 13

This is it…the final post in this series. I know what you’re thinking: “About D@#$ Time!” Sorry it’s taken so long to get this done.

In the first post of the series, we Introduced the CZ-82 to our collection and identified the areas that needed work.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 1, we discussed the loose grips issue and disassembled the slide components.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 2, we disassembled the magazine catch and lightened the magazine catch spring tension.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 3, we removed and disassembled the safety and disassembled the slide.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 4, we removed the slide stop and spring, and then the trigger, trigger spring and trigger bar.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 5, we removed main spring, hammer, sear, and associated other fire control parts.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 6, we covered the basic trigger job.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 7, we reinstalled the hammer strut, hammer, sear, auto safety, ejector, and disconnector.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 8, we reinstalled the trigger, trigger bar and trigger spring.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 9, we reinstalled the mainspring and plug and the safety assembly.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 10, we reinstalled the slide stop and trigger guard latch pin.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 11, we reassembled the magazine catch and reinstalled the trigger guard.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 12, we reassembled the slide and installed it on the frame.

In this edition, we’re going to install and review the fancy new grips I got from Marschalgrips and then discuss how I feel about the corrections I made and how it all turned out.

As a reminder, the reason I decided to replace the grips was because the original plastic grips had a tendency to move on the frame making it hard to be consistent. A commenter drew my attention to the fact that overtightening the grip screws can cause tiny cracks in the grips making them impossible to ever get tight again. With that in mind, and with an eye toward making the pistol a bit prettier, I ordered new grips from marschalgrips.com.

Marshalgrips has a very good selection of grip styles for the CZ, but I wasn’t looking for anything too custom. One problem is that I’m left handed, but my wife and kids like shooting my guns too, so if I got custom, finger groove/thumb rest grips made for me, they wouldn’t be able to shoot it comfortably. With that in mind, I went with the standard ambidextrous grips in checkered walnut, grey finish. The cost was $45 plus shipping.

I wasn’t expecting the turnaround time to be speedy and I wasn’t disappointed, it took over a month to get them after placing the order, but that is expected with a craftsman who makes each set individually.

When I did get the package, I took a picture because I’ve never gotten any mail from Budapest Hungary before and I thought it was interesting.

At any rate, I was very happy with the initial look. The craftsmanship is very good, the lines clean, the finish smooth and even and the screw holes were reinforced with recessed metal rings.

So far so good.

They installed easily enough, but I immediately ran into a problem: The magazine fit was now tight to the point that I couldn’t even insert the mag all the way without forcing it. I’m pretty picky about mags dropping free on their own after the mag release is pressed so that wasn’t going to do at all.

The problem was easy enough to identify. The magazine well inside the grip was just barely too small.

Not a problem, a bit of 600 grit emery cloth and some fitting took care of the problem with alacrity.

I had to remove a little from the front of both grips.

After fitting them a bit better, the mags inserted and dropped free perfectly.

But then I ran into another minor problem.

The safety on the left side was a little to close to the frame and the new grip was interfering with its operation.

This is a more significant problem because it required fitting on the outside of the grip…where the finish is.

I removed as little as possible from the corner to allow the safety to operate and didn’t mar the finish too badly.

Unfortunately, over time, the safety has caused some marring of the finish since I installed the grips. which I’m a little disappointed about.

I can try touching up the finish, but I’m afraid I won’t pick exactly the right color and it won’t blend well. It’s really not that noticeable and this is a working gun, not a wall-hanger, so I can live with it.

The only other thing I’m disappointed about is that I could still feel a slight bit of movement of the grips on the frame. I don’t think this is a hit on the grips themselves, I think it is a flaw in the design of the pistol. There is basically nothing holding the grips in place except the single mount screw and it is simply impossible to get the screws tight enough to stop the movement without damaging the grips. The Marschal grips were significantly better in this regard than the originals, but there was still some movement.

I did find a solution however. What I ended up doing is trimming a piece of double sided scotch tape for each side and placing it between the grip and frame at the rear over the mainspring well. Then I used locktite on the screw threads when I installed them.

After a couple of hours, the glue on the tape adhered well enough that I can’t feel the movement any more, but I still should be able to get the grips off with no problem when the time comes.

At any rate, here’s what the finished product looks like.

I am very pleased with the looks of the pistol with these grips and I am impressed with the workmanship and quality of the grips. The minor fitting problems I had did not surprise me overly considering that the grips were made some 4500 miles away from the frame that they were supposed to fit on. I wasn’t expecting a perfect, drop-in fit.

They get my recommendation.

I’ve now had this pistol for some time and have been carrying it regularly as my discreet carry piece. I’ve also used it to shoot in a couple of bowling pin matches and a steel plate match as well as many trips to the range.

To recap the issues that I had with it when I first got it: The trigger was creepy and rough, the magazine release was too tight making it difficult to release the magazine, the grips moved on the frame, the trigger bit my finger, and it was shooting a bit low and left.

I am very happy with the results of my trigger job. By judicious use of a stone, I reduced the creep dramatically and smoothed it up at the same time. The trigger pull is now light, smooth and crisp.

By replacing the grips and using the double sided tape, I got the grips to stop moving around so that is no longer a problem.

When I reassembled the slide, I did adjust the rear sight a little to the right, which fixed the “shooting to the left” problem. It still shoots just slightly low, but I repainted the front sight and left the paint strip a little below the top of the sight, which encourages me to use more sight when aiming and brings the shots up where they should be.

One thing I forgot to mention is, before reinstalling the trigger, I did use a jewelers file to smooth and round off the edges of the trigger. Then I used 600 grit emery paper to smooth it and touched it up with cold blue. That cured the trigger bite problem. I didn’t have to take much off, just enough to round the edges of the trigger a little more.

One thing about the finish. As noted in the first post of this series, this gun did have some pretty significant holster wear, to the point where the finish was completely gone in a couple of areas. I did clean the finish up with cold blue, but I have to say that the bluing didn’t take as well as I’d have liked and isn’t proving to be very durable.

Finally, I’m VERY happy with the results of weakening the magazine catch spring. The mags are held securely when in use, but I can easily release them with one finger from either side of the mag release.

This little gun is slightly underpowered for a defensive firearm in my opinion, but it is a little hotter than the .380 which is the minimum I’d consider for defensive use. Because of the double stacked mag, it isn’t quite as concealable as it’s single stack cousins like the Makarov, but because of its relatively weak cartridge, I like the idea of having 13 rounds to work with.

The recoil is a little snappy, but not unmanageable and it is very accurate. I have been consistently pleased with its performance and have never had a failure to feed, fire, eject etc.

It is not too heavy (of course this is very subjective…my standard carry piece is a full sized 1911 that I carry openly so I’m used to a relatively heavy gun) and I am able to carry it with an IWB holster, even under a tucked shirt, without printing.

As far as disadvantages: it is hard to find parts for them because they’ve never been sold at retail in the US. This is alleviated by the fact that most CZ-83 parts (which are sold here) are identical and will work on the 82. Also, it does not have a decocker, so if you are inclined to carry condition 2 (round in the chamber, hammer down) and fire the first shot in double action, this is not a very safe firearm for that. The only way to decock with a round in the chamber is to use your thumb to lower the hammer while pulling the trigger; which is, in my humble opinion, a recipe for a negligent discharge. This is alleviated by the auto safety which ensures that the hammer cannot contact the firing pin unless the trigger is pulled. In my opinion, this gun is safe to carry in condition 1 (cocked and locked) and that is how I carry it. I WOULD NOT carry it that way loose in a purse or pocket. It would be too easy for the safety to be inadvertently switched off and have something get caught in the trigger. I would only carry this firearm in condition one using a holster that covers the trigger completely.

In a nutshell, I like it. Especially for lefties, I think this is an excellent choice for discreet carry as long as you understand the limitations of the design and keep in mind that these are surplus, used pistols and may require some work to get them into shape.

In fact, I like this gun so much that I bought a couple more to play with. One thing I’m definitely going to do is try a complete refinish on them. I’m thinking Parkerizing. At any rate, when I get to that, I’ll be sure to post the step-by-step and we’ll see how it turns out together.

Thank you again for your patience in waiting for me to get this series finished. I hope you weren’t disappointed.

CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 12

In the first post of the series, we Introduced the CZ-82 to our collection and identified the areas that needed work.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 1, we discussed the loose grips issue and disassembled the slide components.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 2, we disassembled the magazine catch and lightened the magazine catch spring tension.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 3, we removed and disassembled the safety and disassembled the slide.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 4, we removed the slide stop and spring, and then the trigger, trigger spring and trigger bar.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 5, we removed main spring, hammer, sear, and associated other fire control parts.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 6, we covered the basic trigger job.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 7, we reinstalled the hammer strut, hammer, sear, auto safety, ejector, and disconnector.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 8, we reinstalled the trigger, trigger bar and trigger spring.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 9, we reinstalled the mainspring and plug and the safety assembly.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 10, we reinstalled the slide stop and trigger guard latch pin.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 11, we reassembled the magazine catch and reinstalled the trigger guard.

In this edition, we’re going to reassemble the slide.

The slide reassembly is pretty straight forward. I didn’t remove the front sights so I don’t have pictures of reinstalling that.

The extractor spring goes into the well on the right side of the slide.

Then the extractor goes over the top of that.

I know that this picture is fuzzy, I apologize. After placing the extractor and spring into the slide, I used a punch through the extractor pin hole to hold the extractor and spring in place; then I clamped the slide into the padded jaws of my vise. That holds the slide and also keeps the extractor aligned properly for reinstalling the pin. Once it is clamped tightly, the punch is removed from the hole and the pin is driven in place. The hole in the slide may be peened or swaged at the bottom, so it will probably be easier to install the pin from the top.

Once seated correctly, the pin should not protrude past the top of the slide…

…nor should it protrude past the bottom. If it sticks out too much on the bottom, it will interfere with the movement of the slide.

Next is the firing pin and spring.

The “pointy end” of the firing pin slides into the spring, then the are both placed into the hole at the rear of the slide.

Then use a punch or some other tool to push the firing pin in enough for the firing pin stop to go in. It goes rounded side toward the top of the slide.

Once the stop is far enough down, remove the punch and then push the stop all the way down until the rear of the firing pin locks into the hole in the stop.

Then drive the rear sight in from right to left and center it on the slide.

As I said, I didn’t take the front sight off, but it is simply tapped into place and the roll-pin driven in.

Finally, put the slide back onto the frame. Unfortunately, I didn’t think to take pictures of this while doing it because I’d recently finished my “CZ-82 Field Stripping” Video…which includes this part of assembly. It occurred to me that, for the sake of thoroughness, I should include reinstalling the slide onto the frame in these posts, so I went back and took pictures later. If you notice that the grips are already installed in these pictures, even though we haven’t covered that yet, that’s why.

Installing the slide onto the frame is simple. First, ensure that the trigger guard is pulled down into the “unlocked” position.

Slide the recoil spring over the barrel.

Catching the recoil spring and compressing it with the slide, slip the barrel through the hole in the front of the slide.

The slide will stay angled up as you move it rearward, compressing the recoil spring.

When the slide is completely to the rear, the rails will engage the frame and it will pop down into position.

Release the slide and allow it to return to its fully forward position.

Press up on the trigger guard to lock the slide in place. You should feel a definite “click” and the front of the trigger guard should move up a good quarter-inch or so.

And there you have it.

Next time we’ll install and review the Marschal grips that I bought for it and I’ll review and evaluate the changes, corrections that I made and I’ll discuss how I feel about the pistol now that I’ve had it for a while, been carrying it regularly and have put a few hundred rounds downrange.

Final Post of the series.

CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 11

In the first post of the series, we Introduced the CZ-82 to our collection and identified the areas that needed work.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 1, we discussed the loose grips issue and disassembled the slide components.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 2, we disassembled the magazine catch and lightened the magazine catch spring tension.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 3, we removed and disassembled the safety and disassembled the slide.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 4, we removed the slide stop and spring, and then the trigger, trigger spring and trigger bar.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 5, we removed main spring, hammer, sear, and associated other fire control parts.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 6, we covered the basic trigger job.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 7, we reinstalled the hammer strut, hammer, sear, auto safety, ejector, and disconnector.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 8, we reinstalled the trigger, trigger bar and trigger spring.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 9, we reinstalled the mainspring and plug and the safety assembly.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 10, we reinstalled the slide stop and trigger guard latch pin.

In this edition, we’re going to reinstall the magazine catch into the trigger guard and then reinstall the trigger guard onto the frame. As a reminder, in Part 2, we described how to lighten the magazine catch spring. Since doing that I’ve been very happy with the tension on the magazine catch which was very heavy to begin with.

The first step is to assemble the three components that make up the magazine catch.

The small “T” shaped part is the Magazine Catch Lever and goes on top of the larger part…the Magazine Catch…

…and then the spring goes over the plunger on the magazine catch.

On the trigger guard housing, the magazine catch push button is inserted from the side with the larger, oblog hole toward the flat face of the trigger guard housing (away from the trigger guard) and the notch on top.

Center it in from left to right.

Next, slide the catch assembly into the flat face of the trigger guard housing. The small magazine catch lever should be on top when installing. The base of the “T” of the lever will slide into the notch in the magazine catch button.

Next is the magazine catch lever pin. It has an indentation on one end forming sort of a “head”. The “head” should be down when installing.

You’ll have to push the magzaine catch in to get the pin to go through but it should be a loose fit. It should slide right in. Only insert the pin until it is flush with the bottom of the trigger guard housing. If you put it in too far, it will interfere with the trigger guard pin. Release the pressure on the magazine catch and the spring tension will hold the pin in place.

Next, install the trigger guard housing onto the frame.

And tap in the trigger guard housing pin.

Almost done. All that’s left is to reassemble and reinstall the slide, reinstall the grips and test it out at the range.

Next Post in the series.

CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 10

In the first post of the series, we Introduced the CZ-82 to our collection and identified the areas that needed work.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 1, we discussed the loose grips issue and disassembled the slide components.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 2, we disassembled the magazine catch and lightened the magazine catch spring tension.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 3, we removed and disassembled the safety and disassembled the slide.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 4, we removed the slide stop and spring, and then the trigger, trigger spring and trigger bar.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 5, we removed main spring, hammer, sear, and associated other fire control parts.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 6, we covered the basic trigger job.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 7, we reinstalled the hammer strut, hammer, sear, auto safety, ejector, and disconnector.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 8, we reinstalled the trigger, trigger bar and trigger spring.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 9, we reinstalled the mainspring and plug and the safety assembly.

In this edition, we’re going to reinstall the slide stop.

The trigger guard latch pin is also an integral part of the slide stop installation so it will be installed in this edition as well.

First, the slide stop goes easily into its hole in the frame from the left side. Note the hole in the slide stop shaft.

After the slide stop is fully seated, the hole will be basically right up against the edge of the frame. It is a little hard to see in the pictures so I used an arrow to point it out.

The straight end of the slide stop spring slides into the hole in the slide stop shaft.

Next, get the trigger guard latch pin started into its hole. It should be inserted from the left side of the frame and the part with the small “nipple” should be inserted first.

After the pin is started, use needle nose pliers, a dental pick or other instrument to push the slide stop spring up into the frame and out of the way of the trigger housing pin. Then push the pin the in until it contacts the other side of the frame.

As soon as the pin is in far enough to prevent the spring from popping down below it, you can release the spring.

Then tap the trigger housing latch pin the rest of the way in. It should go in fairly easily until the right (smaller) part starts to go into the hole on the right side of the frame. At that point, it should require a tap or two to seat it.

After the pin is fully seated, the recessed ring around the pin should be visible toward the left side of the frame. The crooked end of the slide stop spring pops into that recessed ring to hold the spring in place and maintain spring tension on the slide stop.

Now the slide stop should held in place by the spring. You should be able to push it down easily, but it should pop back up under spring tension when released.

That’s it. Next we’ll install the magazine catch into the trigger guard housing and install the trigger guard housing onto the frame.

Next Post in the series.

CZ-82 Gunsmigthing Part 9

In the first post of the series, we Introduced the CZ-82 to our collection and identified the areas that needed work.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 1, we discussed the loose grips issue and disassembled the slide components.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 2, we disassembled the magazine catch and lightened the magazine catch spring tension.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 3, we removed and disassembled the safety and disassembled the slide.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 4, we removed the slide stop and spring, and then the trigger, trigger spring and trigger bar.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 5, we removed main spring, hammer, sear, and associated other fire control parts.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 6, we covered the basic trigger job.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 7, we reinstalled the hammer strut, hammer, sear, auto safety, ejector, and disconnector.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 8, we reinstalled the trigger, trigger bar and trigger spring.

In this edition, we’re going to reinstall the mainspring and cap and the safety.

The only trick with the mainspring was to be sure that the hammer strut was in the right place before putting the mainspring under tension. You can’t really see what’s going on up there with everything in place so you kind of have to do it by feel. The strut should be pretty well centered and straight in the frame to be sure that it engages the hammer properly.

The first thing I did is slide the spring onto the hammer strut.

Then the cap over the end of the spring.

Then, while keeping slight tension on the spring, I used a pick to straighten and align the hammer strut. While keeping a bit of tension on the spring, I checked the hammer operation to make sure the strut was engaging it properly. You may have to futz around with it a bit to get it just right, but it shouldn’t be too difficult.

After you’re sure the hammer strut is aligned and engaging the hammer properly, continue to keep a little pressure on the spring to hold it in position until installation is finished.

The easiest way I found to compress the spring was to put the end of the cap against my bench and then press the pistol toward it to compress the spring. Before compressing the spring, make sure the cap is turned so that the slot aligns with the pin holes in the frame.

Once the cap slot aligns with the holes in the frame, simply slide the pin into place. This pin is a loose fit, it is held in by the mainspring tension and the grips. It should not have to be driven in and put a finger under the bottom hole to keep it from dropping completely through as you slip it in.

The safety is also a fairly straightforward operation.

The first step is to install the safety latch spring. It is a very small spring that fits into a well on the right side of the safety (it looks like the left in these pictures because the safety is upside down).

Then the safety latch goes into place and presses against the spring. There will be some spring tension so be careful while installing the latch to keep it from shooting across the room. The spring especially is pretty small and would be easy to lose.

Once the latch is in place, it snaps into the body of the safety so it holds itself in place once positioned.

The safety fits over the “beavertail” section of the rear of the frame behind and below the hammer.

After the safety is in place, install the safety pin. It may need a tap or two to get it completely in place, but shouldn’t require a lot of force.

Center the pin and…done.

Next up, we’ll install the slide stop.

Next Post in the series.

CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 8

In the first post of the series, we Introduced the CZ-82 to our collection and identified the areas that needed work.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 1, we discussed the loose grips issue and disassembled the slide components.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 2, we disassembled the magazine catch and lightened the magazine catch spring tension.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 3, we removed and disassembled the safety and disassembled the slide.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 4, we removed the slide stop and spring, and then the trigger, trigger spring and trigger bar.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 5, we removed main spring, hammer, sear, and associated other fire control parts.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 6, we covered the basic trigger job.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 7, we reinstalled the hammer strut, hammer, sear, auto safety, ejector, and disconnector.

In this edition, we’re going to reinstall the trigger parts.

As usual, click all pix to make bigger.

First, it’s hard to see how they go together when installed in the frame, so lets take a look at the components and how they go together before we install them.

This is laid out exactly as they should go together (albeit upside down).

There are holes for the trigger spring in both the trigger bar and the trigger itself.

As you are putting the parts together, be sure the spring is oriented correctly and that the spring arms go into the holes in both the trigger bar and trigger.

To assemble, first put the trigger bar in through the magazine well.

It may take a little finagling, but shouldn’t be too difficult.

The rear of the trigger bar will seat into the notch in the riveted on plate on the right side of the grip frame.

You have to push the front of the trigger bar down below the frame to install the trigger spring and trigger. To keep from occupying a hand to hold the trigger bar in position, I used a jeweler’s screwdriver to hold the trigger bar down in the proper position.

The trigger spring is now installed with the coil down and the arm of the spring into the hole in the trigger bar.

Next, holding the trigger out straight, slide the trigger into place ensuring that the other arm of the spring goes into the hole in the trigger.

At this point, I used a dental pick to hold the three pieces in position. If you don’t do this, you will have to try to hold all three pieces while inserting the small pin into the holes. Basically, there are two holes in the trigger bar, two holes in the trigger and the coil of the spring that all have to be properly aligned to get the pin to go though. I found that lining them up with the dental pick and then sliding it out as I slid the pin in made it go very smoothly.

The pin does not fit tightly…it is held in by the frame so it shouldn’t need to be driven in, it should just slide into place. Wiggle the dental pick around if you need to as the pin is going in and the pick is coming out to get all the holes aligned as the pin goes in.

Then remove the jewelers screwdriver that was keeping the trigger bar propped below the frame, turn the trigger down into position (if the trigger bar, trigger and spring were all installed correctly, there should be some spring tension), align the trigger pivot hole with the holes in the frame and install the trigger pin. The trigger pin will need to be driven in but shouldn’t require more than gentle taps to get it in.

There you have it. Next up: Installing the mainspring and safety.

Next Post in the series.

CZ-82 Gunsmithing, Part 7

[Update] I changed the section on reinstalling the ejector. There was a long gap between performing it and blogging about it and I simply didn’t remember one part of it correctly. Something jogged my memory and I’ve now corrected that section. Sorry for the inconvenience.[/Update]

In the first post of the series, we Introduced the CZ-82 to our collection and identified the areas that needed work.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 1, we discussed the loose grips issue and disassembled the slide components.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 2, we disassembled the magazine catch and lightened the magazine catch spring tension.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 3, we removed and disassembled the safety and disassembled the slide.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 4, we removed the slide stop and spring, and then the trigger, trigger spring and trigger bar.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 5, we removed main spring, hammer, sear, and associated other fire control parts.
In CZ-82 Gunsmithing Part 6, we covered the basic trigger job.

In this edition of CZ-82 gunsmithing, we’re going to start reassembly.

As usual, click all pix to make bigger.

First, drop the hammer strut down into the mainspring well.

It will just kind of flop around in there until we get a couple of other components in so don’t worry about positioning too much, just keep it from falling back out.

Next, the hammer lever pin slies into the hole in the hammer body.

It’s a loose fit and the lever should be able to swivel freely. The lever should be installed toward the front of the hammer.

Next, drop the hammer and lever into the frame.

Don’t install the hammer pin yet, just let the hammer and lever rest in the frame.

The next step is to install the sear. It has a channel (the arrow points to this area) with ears on either side. The ears straddle the frame when installed.

The sear goes in from the bottom one of the “ears” that form the channel on the outside, one on the inside of the frame. The flat face of the sear goes forward.

This picture doesn’t show it, but the hammer should be forward when installing the sear.

Once the sear is in place, partially install the pin, just enough to keep the sear from falling out, don’t push it all the way in yet.

Next the sear spring is placed in the sear.

When properly installed, the bent arm of the sear spring will be to the rear and laying atop the arm of the sear. The straight arm of the sear spring will be pointing up.

Once the sear sping is installed and positioned correctly, the coiled part of the spring should be aligned with the sear pin holes. Push the pin the rest of the way in to secure the sear and sear spring.

At this point, install the hammer pin.

When installed correctly, the end with the small “nipple” will be to the left.

Now for the fun part. This was the most challenging part of the entire re-assembly process.

With the ejector upside down, place the auto safety into the bottom of the ejector.

The “hammerhead” part of the auto safety should go to the rear, or away from the arm of the ejector.

I ended up using a small piece of toothpick to through the pin holes of the ejector and auto safety to hold them together while assembling. I cut the toothpick piece down so that it would fit inside the frame, then, when I was driving in the ejector pin, the piece of toothpick was driven out. This maintained their relative positions until they could be secured by the pin. After having tried several things to get it together, I was a bit frustrated at this point and ended up not taking any pictures with the piece of toothpick holding them together.

While holding the auto safety and ejector together (preferably with the piece of toothpick that I described) place them atop the sear and sear spring.

It may be easier if you hold the frame upside down and raise the ejector into position.

There is a very small crease in the bottom of the auto safety that engages the sear spring. The sear spring not only holds pressure on the sear, but also on the auto safety. It is IMPERATIVE that the auto safety be installed correctly and that the sear spring engages it properly.

You may have to lift up the front of the ejector slightly and use a dental pick, jewelers screwdriver or other object to manipulate the spring into the right position on the auto safety. There is also a small hole in the top of the ejector through which you can see the spring. You may be able to manipulate the spring through that hole to get it seated correctly.

After you have pressed the ejector and auto safety into place, using your fingers to place pressure on the hammer and to operate the sear, make sure the sear engages and releases the hammer correctly, that the sear and the auto safety both are under spring tension and pop back into position after being pressed.

I had a heck of a time getting the spring to stay in the right place and engaged with the auto safety. it took me several tries to get it to align and operate correctly. Ultimately, the toothpick trick helped me get it but it still wasn’t a piece of cake. Be patient, if it doesn’t work, raise the ejector up slightly, re-align the auto safety withe the spring and push the ejector back down again. Try it as many times as you need to because if this mechanism doesn’t work correctly, the firearm will be unsafe and/or inoperable.

After the ejector and auto safety are in position and you are sure that the sear spring is properly seated and working correctly, drive the ejector pin in, thereby driving out the piece of toothpick used to hold it together for assembly.

Finally, install the disconnector into it’s well in the frame.

And then install the pin that holds the disconnector.

At this point, the hammer strut should still be rattling loosely around inside the mainspring well, but it should be prevented from falling out by the various parts and pins we just installed.

Next time, we’ll install the trigger components.

Next Post in the series.

New Video

At the request of a reader via e-mail, here is how the CZ-82 magazine is disassembled and reassembled:

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Hope it helps.